OPAL

Information and Advice for Adults in East Dunbartonshire

Category: Uncategorized (Page 1 of 3)

Sport for All this May/June

Accessible sports for pupils with ASN, running for 4 weeks. Info on poster below:

Health Improvement Scotland: now recruiting for new public partners

Are you passionate about making care better in Scotland? Would you like to strengthen the voice of people who use health and social care services? Would you like to gain experience volunteering?

If the answer to these questions is yes, then we have an exciting opportunity for you!

Health Improvement Scotland are looking for volunteers, known as public partners, to help us make sure that people’s experiences of care are used to make care better. HIS fully embrace equality and value diversity, and welcome interest from anyone who would like to get involved, provided they are over 18 and live in Scotland. This year they are particularly encouraging interest from young people (aged 18-26), minority ethnic people, and lesbian gay, bisexual and trans people, as these groups are underrepresented in our current volunteer pool.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Iain McClumpha on 0141 429 7545 or iain.mcclumpha@scottishhealthcouncil.org.

Requests for application packs should be sent to Contactpublicinvolvement.his@nhs.net .

Please click below for the flyer and details of how to apply.

Completed application forms will be accepted up until 5 February 2018, so plenty of time for people to act on their New Year’s resolutions to volunteer this year!

How best to sit at your desk

Reading this whilst sat at your computer?.. I’m typing this whilst sat at mine..

The array of health problems associated with sitting down for too long is an impressive list; lower back pain, wrist pain, a really tight neck, or a lack of mobility to name a few, but studies have also linked excessive sitting with being overweight and obese, type 2 diabetes, some types of cancer, and early death.

Many adults in the UK spend more than seven hours a day sitting or lying, and this typically increases with age to 10 hours or more.

If you are unavoidably going to be sitting at your desk for a long period of time, here’s some tips on how to do so with less of an impact on your health:

STEP 1: Your Chair

  • Push your hips as far back as they can go in the chair.
  • Adjust the seat height so your feet are flat on the floor and your knees equal to, or slightly lower than, your hips.
  • Adjust the back of the chair to a 100°-110° reclined angle. Make sure your upper and lower back are supported. Use inflatable cushions or small pillows if necessary. If you have an active back mechanism on your chair, use it to make frequent position changes.
  • Adjust the armrests (if fitted) so that your shoulders are relaxed. If your armrests are in the way, remove them.

STEP 2: Your Keyboard

An articulating keyboard tray can provide optimal positioning of input devices. However, it should accommodate the mouse, enable leg clearance, and have an adjustable height and tilt mechanism. The tray should not push you too far away from other work materials, such as your telephone.

  • Pull up close to your keyboard.
  • Position the keyboard directly in front of your body.
  • Determine what section of the keyboard you use most frequently, and readjust the keyboard so that section is centred with your body.
  • Adjust the keyboard height so that your shoulders are relaxed, your elbows are in a slightly open position (100° to 110°), and your wrists and hands are straight.
  • The tilt of your keyboard is dependent upon your sitting position. Use the keyboard tray mechanism, or keyboard feet, to adjust the tilt. If you sit in a forward or upright position, try tilting your keyboard away from you at a negative angle. If you are reclined, a slight positive tilt will help maintain a straight wrist position.
  • Wristrests can help to maintain neutral postures and pad hard surfaces. However, the wristrest should only be used to rest the palms of the hands between keystrokes. Resting on the wristrest while typing is not recommended. Avoid using excessively wide wristrests, or wristrests that are higher than the space bar of your keyboard.
  • Place the pointer as close as possible to the keyboard. Placing it on a slightly inclined surface, or using it on a mousebridge placed over the 10-keypad, can help to bring it closer.

If you do not have a fully adjustable keyboard tray, you may need to adjust your workstation height, the height of your chair, or use a seat cushion to get into a comfortable position. Remember to use a footrest if your feet dangle.

STEP 3: Screen, Document, and Telephone

Incorrect positioning of the screen and source documents can result in awkward postures. Adjust the screen and source documents so that your neck is in a neutral, relaxed position.

  • Centre the screen directly in front of you, above your keyboard.
  • Position the top of the screen approximately 2-3” above seated eye level. (If you wear bifocals, lower the screen to a comfortable reading level.)
  • Sit at least an arm’s length away from the screenand then adjust the distance for your vision.
  • Reduce glare by careful positioning of the screen.Position source documents directly in front of you, between the screen and the keyboard, using an in-line copy stand. If there is insufficient space, place source documents on a document holder positioned adjacent to the screen.
    • Place screen at right angles to windows
    • Adjust curtains or blinds as needed
    • Adjust the vertical screen angle and screen controls to minimize glare from overhead lights
    • Other techniques to reduce glare include use of optical glass glare filters, light filters, or secondary task lights
  • Place your telephone within easy reach. Telephone stands or arms can help.
  • Use headsets and speaker phone to eliminate cradling the handset.

STEP 4: Pauses and Breaks

Once you have correctly set up your computer workstation use good work habits. No matter how perfect the environment, prolonged, static postures will inhibit blood circulation and take a toll on your body.

  • Take short 1-2 minute stretch breaks every 20-30 minutes. After each hour of work, take a break or change tasks for at least 5-10 minutes. Always try to get away from your computer during lunch breaks.
  • Avoid eye fatigue by resting and refocusing your eyes periodically. Look away from the monitor and focus on something in the distance.
  • Rest your eyes by covering them with your palms for 10-15 seconds.
  • Use correct posture when working. Keep moving as much as possible.

Full article available at Dohrmann Consulting/Ergonomics website

NHS 24 Annual Review: Members of the public welcome

NHS 24’s Annual Review will take place on Monday 18th December 2017 at the; Golden Jubilee Conference Hotel, Beardmore Road, Clydebank, Glasgow, G81 4SA from 2pm to 4pm.

Members of the public are welcome to attend the event.

If you do wish to attend, please contact NHS 24 in advance advising them if you have any access or communication requirements.

You can contact them by email at david.morrison@nhs24.scot.nhs.uk or by telephone on 0141 337 4532.

 

Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service – East Dunbartonshire sessions

Every minute of every day someone receives blood as part of a life-saving or life-enhancing treatment. One pint of blood could save up to three people’s lives, however, only 5% of the population are active donors.

The key priority of the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service (SNBTS) is to ensure that the NHS has enough blood to meet the needs of patients in Scotland.

Blood has a relatively short lifespan and the aim is to have at least six days’ worth of all eight blood types in stock.

Here are details of local East Dunbartonshire sessions you may be able to attend:

 

Date Location Time
28 December 2017 Cadder Freestone Social Club, Bishopbriggs 4pm-7.30pm
31 January 2018 Garrell Vale Community Education Centre, Kilsyth 5.15pm-7.30pm
1 February 2018 Lenzie Union Parish Church G66 4LD 4pm-7pm
5 March 2018 Killermont Parish Church, Rannoch Drive, Bearsden, G61 2LD 2pm-3.45pm & 5.15pm-7.30pm
8 March 2018 Milngavie Town Hall G62 8BZ 2pm-3.45pm & 5.15pm-7.15pm

 

Most people aged between 17 and 65 who weigh at least eight stone and are generally fit and healthy can donate blood.

For more information visit scotblood.co.uk or call 0846 90 90 999.

Implementing FIT – Scotland’s New Bowel Screening Test

Implementing FIT – Scotland’s New Bowel Screening Test

Currently 1 in 2 people survive bowel cancer for more than 10 years; Cancer Research UK is working to make that figure 3 out of 4 people by 2034.

We can do this if we continue to detect cancers early and one way to do that is through participation in screening programmes.

 

The national bowel screening programme currently detects around 6% of all bowel cancers in Scotland and 63% are detected are found at stage 1 which means a better chance of survival.

 

The new test was introduced to the Greater Glasgow & Clyde board area on 20th November 2017.

This is what you need to know:

  • The test is used to detect human blood in your faeces
  • It is more effective than before and requires just one sample making it much easier to do
  • The kit is still sent out by post to anyone aged between 50 and 74 years every two years
  • Replacement kits may be requested by calling 0800 0121833
  • Test result letters should be received within 2 weeks

 

To see how to complete the new test and find out more please click on the link below for a (very) short film telling you everything you need to know:

Please Click To Watch

For more information or access to promotional materials please contact Mandy Ferncombe, Health Improvement Practitioner at mandy.ferncombe@ggc.scot.nhs.uk or 0141 355 2400

NHS GGC – Carers Act

Information from East Dunbartonshire Health & Social Care Partnership:

The Carers (Scotland) Act has a number of responsibilities that Health Boards and Local Authorities need to put in place by April, 2018.

The Act will ensure carers and young carers are identified and supported so they can continue to care if they wish to do so. One completed area of work in NHSGGC is the new resources that aim to increase awareness of support for carers.

These resources were launched on Carers Rights Day last Friday. Carers Rights Day aimed to help carers understand their rights and how to get help and support they are entitled to. We would like to thank carers, patients, health and social care staff and carer support services who helped in its design.

If you require more information on this subject, please contact 0141 955 2131 or 0800 975 2131

Road Safety Week 2017

A road safety charity is calling for action to cut speeding after figures showed more than 9,700 people were injured and 159 killed on Scottish roads in the year to June.

Brake is making the call as part of Road Safety Week after other Scottish Government figures, published earlier in the year, showed a 14 per cent rise in road deaths in Scotland during 2016 compared with 2015.

There were 191 fatalities on the country’s roads in 2016, 23 (or 14 per cent) more than the previous year.

New analysis by Brake found that exceeding the speed limit was a major factor in 291 crashes in Scotland last year, a rise of over a quarter (26 per cent since 2013.

Travelling too fast for the prevailing conditions contributed to 510 crashes during 2016, Brake said.

Provisional statistics from the Department for Transport found that 9,705 people were injured and 159 were killed in crashes on Scottish roads in the year to June 2017.

The charity is now calling for the introduction of a default 20mph limit in all built-up areas, increased police enforcement and Intelligent Speed Adaptation, which helps drivers stay within the speed limit, to be fitted as standard to all new vehicles.

Full article available on Scotsman website

or more information on the Brake charity website

Befriending Service Resource Worker vacancy at EDVA

Befriending Service Resource Worker

Status: 24 hours per week (Monday to Thursday)

Salary: £16,708 (pro-rata)

 

Our Befriending Service provides opportunities to increase the social connectedness and reduce the isolation and loneliness of its service-users; as well as providing high quality volunteering. The post-holder will work within the Befriending Service, providing social contact and practical support to vulnerable socially isolated older adults in East Dunbartonshire on a one-to-one, social-needs assessed basis. You will also support carefully recruited, selected and trained volunteer befrienders.

 

For an application pack or further information contact 0141 578 6680 or email: info@edva.org

 

Completed applications should be returned to info@edva.org by Monday 11th December 2017 (12 noon) and interviews will be Tuesday 19th December 2017 with specific times communicated to successful applicants.

Combat diabetes: 8 ways to control your blood sugar levels

Diabetes is the general term used for conditions which lead to an increase in glucose levels in the blood. With a proper diet and lifestyle change, you can control your blood sugar levels and combat this dangerous disease. Consider and follow these 8 tips;

Family history of diabetes: You inherit a predisposition to the condition and then something in your environment triggers it, especially if there is a history of obesity. Type 2 diabetes has a stronger connection to family history and lineage than type 1, however, with proper diagnosis on time it can be kept under control.

Lifestyle modification: Sedentary habits, eating more junk and fatty food, aerated drinks, and erratic meal habits – all contribute towards the risk of having diabetes. Every extra hour of sitting increases risk of having diabetes by a fifth, warns the doctor. So, by an intensive lifestyle modification, adopting of healthy diets and increased physical activity, type 2 diabetes can be prevented.

Obesity: Gaining weight may make you susceptible to diabetes. As doctor suggests, try to maintain ideal body weight, that is to keep the BMI less than 22.9 Kg/m2 and waist circumference to less than 90 cm in male and 80 cm in females. Get rid of excess weight through a regimented diet and exercise plan. There are no shortcuts to lose weight. Weight loss and a good diet can even reverse pre-diabetes.

Food habits and balanced diet: Eating at right time, an appropriate amount of a balance carbohydrates, fats and proteins with fruits is essential. Not going on an empty stomach for long hours and not missing the meals are important. Studies have shown that missing breakfast increases the risk of developing diabetes. Replace heavy meals after prolong gap with small healthy snacks to munch on. Try to replace your normal rice with brown rice and refined flour with whole grains.

Exercise regularly: From a brisk walk to yoga, exercise daily for at least for 30 to 45 minutes. Sedentary habits are contributing in a big way to increasing incidences of diabetes. Also, taking a break from exercise could up the risks. So make sure to take small breaks in between your work.

Adequate sleep: Not just food and exercise but proper rest is also very important. Getting 7-8 hours of sleep every day is a must as our body rejuvenates itself during sleep by eliminating the toxins which accumulate during the time we are awake. Late nights and late mornings also up the risk of having diabetes and hypertension.

Manage stress: Stress has invaded every part of human life in today’s world. From kids to elderly, stress has become all-encompassing. With too much work and not active break or recreational activities that make us happy and content, we risk our selves to many diseases and diabetes is one of them. While this needs to be addressed at a higher level, it is essential that a person find ways to mitigate this stress.

Regular checkups: Regular blood sugar monitoring, essential intake of medicines and a review check-up with your doctors at regular intervals is must.

[Full article available on Indian Express website]

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