Information and Advice for Adults in East Dunbartonshire

Author: Ronnie Whiteside (Page 1 of 8)

East Dunbartonshire Joint Health Improvement Plan 2018-2021

East Dunbartonshire Health and Social Care Partnership (HSCP) are pleased to share the Joint Health Improvement Plan:

The East Dunbartonshire J-HIP 2018 – 2021 has been informed through engagement with residents, service users, patients, carers, local communities and partners in East Dunbartonshire Council, NHS GGC and the third sector.

The Draft Plan identifies 5 areas for action in East Dunbartonshire that can develop opportunities for individuals, families and communities to be involved in improving their own health and wellbeing:

  • Tobacco prevention, cessation and control
  • Obesity and physical activity
  • Alcohol drug intervention and awareness
  • Positive mental health and capacity building, and
  • Healthy environment

The J-HIP will be led, supported and monitored by the HSCP Health Improvement Team on behalf of the Community Planning Partners who are now seeking your views during this formal consultation stage so they can reflect the views of residents, stakeholder organisations and local communities.

The consultation period is open until the 13 April 2018.

Please send all comments to:

David Radford

Health Improvement & Inequalities Manager

East Dunbartonshire Health and Social Care Partnership

10 Saramago Street


G66 3BF

Email: david.radford@ggc.scot.nhs.scot.uk

The Scottish Gov is looking for your views on the new Suicide Prevention Action Plan

The Scottish Government is seeking to get your views on the new Suicide Prevention Action Plan

The engagement paper was published on 8 March 2018; and interested parties and individuals are now invited to respond formally to the themes and draft actions on suicide prevention over a 7 week period from to 30 April 2018.

You can view the action plan below.


Interested parties can click on this link;


The link will also allow you to access a list of public engagement events organised by NHS Health Scotland and also to complete the electronic consultation.

Festival of Celebration image

Festival of Celebration – Autism & Mental Health

Celebrating the artistic achievements of people with autism, learning disability and mental health issues and the organisations that support them, we are pleased to announce our Festival of Celebration in the run-up to Autism Awareness Week 2018.

Most people are aware of the benefits of taking part in artistic and musical activity as part of a healthy lifestyle. Come and help us celebrate the work of local artists, performers and musicians.

Thursday 22nd March, 5:00pm -7:30pm:
Lillie Art Gallery, Milngavie
Festival Launch

Friday 23rd March, 10:00am – 7:30pm
Kirkintilloch Town Hall
Creative activity and good mental health-
Discussion and briefing by leading music & health practitioner
Gigs and Exhibition

Saturday 24th March, 10:00am – 5:00pm
Kirkintilloch Town Hall
A full day of concerts and performances by local groups and artists.

More details to follow. To register your interest, contact:
George or Ashleigh on 0141 578 2142, or alternatively email :
or visit the ED Autism Facebook page

Phantom Debt Fraud Alert – January 2018 

Information  from East Dunbartonshire HSCP about ‘phantom debt’ fraud

Action Fraud has recently experienced an increase in the number of calls to members of the public by fraudsters requesting payments for a ‘phantom’ debt.  The fraud involves being cold-called by someone purporting to be a debt collector, bailiff or other type of enforcement agent.

The fraudster may claim to be working under instruction of a court, business or other body and suggest they are recovering funds for a non-existent debt.

The fraudsters are requesting payment, sometimes by bank transfer and if refused, they threaten to visit homes or workplaces in order to recover the supposed debt that is owed. In some cases, the victim is also threatened with arrest. From the reports Action Fraud has received, this type of fraud is presently occurring throughout the UK.

It is important to recognise that there are key differences between the various entities who seek to settle debts or outstanding fees in England and Wales.  These differences range from the type of debt they will enforce to the legal powers they possess.

To learn more, please take a look at some of the helpful information and links on the Step Change Debt Charity website


Protect Yourself:

  • Make vigorous checks if you ever get a cold call. Bailiffs for example, should always be able to provide you with a case number and warrant number, along with their name and the court they are calling from; make a note of all details provided to you.
  • If you receive a visit from a bailiff, they must always identify themselves as a Court Bailiff at the earliest possible opportunity.  Ask to see their identity card which they must carry to prove who they are, this card shows their photograph and identity number.
  • They will also carry the physical warrant showing the debt and endorsed with a court seal.  If you work for a business and receive a call or visit, be sure to speak with your manager or business owner first.
  • Never pay the debts yourself on behalf of the business you work for; some fraudsters have suggested employees make payment suggesting they can then be reimbursed by their employer when in reality the debt is non-existent.  Exercise caution believing someone is genuine because you’ve found something on the internet; fraudsters could easily create fake online profiles to make you believe them.
  • Double check with the court, company or public body they claim to work for to confirm whether the call is legitimate; if you use a landline make sure you hear the dialling tone prior to dialling as the caller could still be on the line and you could potentially speak to the fraudster(s) to confirm the non-existent debt.
  • Also be sure to independently search for a telephone number to call; never use a number provided by the caller without carrying out your own research.
  • Do not feel rushed or intimidated to make a decision based on a phone call. Take five and listen to your instincts.  If you know you have a debt, keep in regular contact with your creditor and be sure to establish the debt type at the earliest opportunity if you are not aware. This will help you to understand who might be in contact with you regarding any repayments or arrears.

Health & Social Care Partnership Draft Strategic Plan 2018/21

The East Dunbartonshire HSCP consulted on the Draft Strategic Plan between August and October 2017 and is looking for your views during the next consultation phase.

The content of the draft has been informed through engagement events with staff, service users, patients, carers, local communities and partners in the Council, NHS and third sector.

The HSCP are now seeking your views during this formal consultation stage in order to develop the plan and truly reflect the views of our residents, stakeholder organisations and local communities.

You can view the Strategic Plan here:

This consultation period is open until the 9th February 2018.

Please send all comments to:

Sandra Cairney

Head of Strategy, Planning, and Health Improvement

East Dunbartonshire HSCP

10 Saramago Street


G66 3BF


A Connected Scotland: Tackling social isolation and loneliness and building stronger social connections

The Scottish Government plans to create a new strategy to combat social isolation and loneliness. 

‘In the last Parliamentary term, the Scottish Government welcomed The Equal Opportunities Committee report on Social Isolation which was the first of its kind anywhere in the world. The committee found that social isolation and loneliness was a problem in Scotland, and recommended that the Government developed a national strategy to tackle it.

Social Isolation and loneliness is an issue that can affect anyone at any age or stage of their lives. Feelings of loneliness have been demonstrated to have wide ranging consequences for those effected. and has been shown to lead to depression across all ages, as well as cognitive decline and dementia in older people. There is also the potential for serious physical health implications which have been compared to those of obesity or smoking.

We want a Scotland where individuals and communities are more connected and everyone has the opportunity to develop meaningful relationships regardless of age, status, circumstances or identity. We see the role of communities as vital in achieving this goal, and have already began to empower them to make decisions that help them address their unique priorities. Because communities are so central to tackling this problem, it is important that the people who live in them get to have their say.

We want to hear a wide range of opinions and views from Scotland’s diverse people directly. Although we are arranging a number of engagements up and down the country, we recognise that people who might have an important point to make may not be able to attend.’

Consultation available here

Driving in bad weather guidance

More information available at Transport Scotland

Health Improvement Scotland: now recruiting for new public partners

Are you passionate about making care better in Scotland? Would you like to strengthen the voice of people who use health and social care services? Would you like to gain experience volunteering?

If the answer to these questions is yes, then we have an exciting opportunity for you!

Health Improvement Scotland are looking for volunteers, known as public partners, to help us make sure that people’s experiences of care are used to make care better. HIS fully embrace equality and value diversity, and welcome interest from anyone who would like to get involved, provided they are over 18 and live in Scotland. This year they are particularly encouraging interest from young people (aged 18-26), minority ethnic people, and lesbian gay, bisexual and trans people, as these groups are underrepresented in our current volunteer pool.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Iain McClumpha on 0141 429 7545 or iain.mcclumpha@scottishhealthcouncil.org.

Requests for application packs should be sent to Contactpublicinvolvement.his@nhs.net .

Please click below for the flyer and details of how to apply.

Completed application forms will be accepted up until 5 February 2018, so plenty of time for people to act on their New Year’s resolutions to volunteer this year!

How best to sit at your desk

Reading this whilst sat at your computer?.. I’m typing this whilst sat at mine..

The array of health problems associated with sitting down for too long is an impressive list; lower back pain, wrist pain, a really tight neck, or a lack of mobility to name a few, but studies have also linked excessive sitting with being overweight and obese, type 2 diabetes, some types of cancer, and early death.

Many adults in the UK spend more than seven hours a day sitting or lying, and this typically increases with age to 10 hours or more.

If you are unavoidably going to be sitting at your desk for a long period of time, here’s some tips on how to do so with less of an impact on your health:

STEP 1: Your Chair

  • Push your hips as far back as they can go in the chair.
  • Adjust the seat height so your feet are flat on the floor and your knees equal to, or slightly lower than, your hips.
  • Adjust the back of the chair to a 100°-110° reclined angle. Make sure your upper and lower back are supported. Use inflatable cushions or small pillows if necessary. If you have an active back mechanism on your chair, use it to make frequent position changes.
  • Adjust the armrests (if fitted) so that your shoulders are relaxed. If your armrests are in the way, remove them.

STEP 2: Your Keyboard

An articulating keyboard tray can provide optimal positioning of input devices. However, it should accommodate the mouse, enable leg clearance, and have an adjustable height and tilt mechanism. The tray should not push you too far away from other work materials, such as your telephone.

  • Pull up close to your keyboard.
  • Position the keyboard directly in front of your body.
  • Determine what section of the keyboard you use most frequently, and readjust the keyboard so that section is centred with your body.
  • Adjust the keyboard height so that your shoulders are relaxed, your elbows are in a slightly open position (100° to 110°), and your wrists and hands are straight.
  • The tilt of your keyboard is dependent upon your sitting position. Use the keyboard tray mechanism, or keyboard feet, to adjust the tilt. If you sit in a forward or upright position, try tilting your keyboard away from you at a negative angle. If you are reclined, a slight positive tilt will help maintain a straight wrist position.
  • Wristrests can help to maintain neutral postures and pad hard surfaces. However, the wristrest should only be used to rest the palms of the hands between keystrokes. Resting on the wristrest while typing is not recommended. Avoid using excessively wide wristrests, or wristrests that are higher than the space bar of your keyboard.
  • Place the pointer as close as possible to the keyboard. Placing it on a slightly inclined surface, or using it on a mousebridge placed over the 10-keypad, can help to bring it closer.

If you do not have a fully adjustable keyboard tray, you may need to adjust your workstation height, the height of your chair, or use a seat cushion to get into a comfortable position. Remember to use a footrest if your feet dangle.

STEP 3: Screen, Document, and Telephone

Incorrect positioning of the screen and source documents can result in awkward postures. Adjust the screen and source documents so that your neck is in a neutral, relaxed position.

  • Centre the screen directly in front of you, above your keyboard.
  • Position the top of the screen approximately 2-3” above seated eye level. (If you wear bifocals, lower the screen to a comfortable reading level.)
  • Sit at least an arm’s length away from the screenand then adjust the distance for your vision.
  • Reduce glare by careful positioning of the screen.Position source documents directly in front of you, between the screen and the keyboard, using an in-line copy stand. If there is insufficient space, place source documents on a document holder positioned adjacent to the screen.
    • Place screen at right angles to windows
    • Adjust curtains or blinds as needed
    • Adjust the vertical screen angle and screen controls to minimize glare from overhead lights
    • Other techniques to reduce glare include use of optical glass glare filters, light filters, or secondary task lights
  • Place your telephone within easy reach. Telephone stands or arms can help.
  • Use headsets and speaker phone to eliminate cradling the handset.

STEP 4: Pauses and Breaks

Once you have correctly set up your computer workstation use good work habits. No matter how perfect the environment, prolonged, static postures will inhibit blood circulation and take a toll on your body.

  • Take short 1-2 minute stretch breaks every 20-30 minutes. After each hour of work, take a break or change tasks for at least 5-10 minutes. Always try to get away from your computer during lunch breaks.
  • Avoid eye fatigue by resting and refocusing your eyes periodically. Look away from the monitor and focus on something in the distance.
  • Rest your eyes by covering them with your palms for 10-15 seconds.
  • Use correct posture when working. Keep moving as much as possible.

Full article available at Dohrmann Consulting/Ergonomics website

Blue Badge pilot scheme made permanent

The disabled person’s parking badge pilot, which was launched in April 2016, has been made permanent by the Scottish Government.

The eligibility criteria were revised and extended under a pilot to allow carers and relatives of people who pose a risk to themselves or others in traffic to apply for a disabled person’s parking badge, provided they meet the criteria.

The Transport Scotland Blue Badge Working Group, established in 2015, has been evaluating the pilot and put forward recommendations that the extension should be made permanent, which has now been agreed.

OPAL can help you apply for a blue badge and provide guidance on how to do so but for more information on the rules and regulations around their use, please visit www.mygov.scot/apply-blue-badge

Full article available on Transport Scotland.

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